Film Star and Bodyguard – Richard Norton Interview P.3

Film Star and Bodyguard – Interview with Richard Norton p.3!

Here’s the third and final part of the awesome interview with Richard Norton! Enjoy, and share the awesomeness!

Let’s go back to the martial arts side then. What do you think martial arts, both traditional and reality based can offer to the 21st century? Do they still hold relevance?

Yes and no. I think they do if the style and instructor has the wisdom to integrate it into today’s world. You’re right; a lot of the traditional kata or weapons work doesn’t really have much relevance in today’s combat arena, but then it doesn’t always have to. I mean you’re not going to be walking around the street with a Katana or Sai in your hand, so that side of it, for me, is about the art part of ‘martial art’. I think we can often focus too much on the ‘Martial’ and not enough on the ‘Art’ side of what we do. The mental and spiritual side of the arts, I think, has a tremendous amount of benefit and relevance in today’s world due to the stresses and everything we go through in day to day life, purely just to make a living and have ends meet. To have something in your daily life that’s about spiritual balance is, to me, very important. The battlefield of today isn’t about samurai style on horseback; it’s a couple of guys outside a nightclub with a blade trying to cut you up, or your boss in your day job piling endless files on your desk with a deadline to get done.  I love the traditional arts and the way it is just about me and the perfecting of my art with the mind, body and spirit in unison and I truly believe having that togetherness will help you in many a real situation. But I of course also think you need the stress tested reality based techniques as well as the traditional as these are what will really help you in a physical life or death situation. You see, in most traditional dojo’s, everything we do is structured; we bow, step up and fight to specific protocols and rules, its what I call, consensual sparring. We know we are going to fight; there are rules and a referee. In the street there are no rules and you have no way of knowing what’s going to happen. A lot of traditional clubs will not or cannot teach you what that aspect of combat is really like, and that’s where we need to address the balance. As an example, I was once teaching a class of MMA students and I decided to ask them just why they were all there. In this case, the MMA style I was asked to teach was more UFC style; backs against the cage etc. As it turned out, 90% of those in attendance said they were interested primarily in real life self-defence. So I said well then that cuts out about 70% of what I would in a ‘sport’ MMA class .I mean in the street, if I happen to take you down in a fight with a version of a double or single leg, I absolutely no longer want to go down to the ground with you, as I primarily then have to worry about the possibility of other ‘bad’ people around kicking my head in whilst I’m tied up with you. How many times in the street will you have your back up against a cage? In street MMA, I would teach a hybrid takedown, then be immediately scanning to see if there are opponents 2, 3 or 4 that I may have to deal with. So you can have the traditional and the reality. The reverse punch comes from the hip which is probably the way I’d launch a pre-emptive strike. In the end a punch is a punch, a kick is a kick, it’s the delivery systems that matter and the stimulus for delivery of that punch or kick i.e. getting shoved and screamed at, dealing with the stress factors, then launching into the physical side. This is why I like arts like BJJ as a sport, because for the most part, there is no theory. When we tap out, it’s for a good reason; your arm’s getting tweaked or you’re going to sleep for a bit. It’s the same with boxing or kickboxing. You are usually either hitting or getting hit. You can theorise all you like, but it is what it is from a combat point of view. Yes, there are still rules, but even the UFC has strict rules. At least though it’s as close as you can get to a real fight, hopefully without sustaining life-threatening injuries.

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So, finally your plans for the future? You’ve alluded to a big project next year that you can’t speak too much about but anything you can tell us?

For me really its business as usual. I’m really excited about the project next year, it’s huge! I’m 65 in a month and in this business you can get into the mind-set of, ‘wow, maybe is this the last job? Then you get a call out of the blue for a gig and off we go again! As I have already said, my passion for the martial arts is what has brought about all the great opportunities like bodyguard work, film work and whatever in my life. Again, I truly believe that the great through line for me to continue to have is to just continue striving to be the best martial artist I can be, and then the universe will look after me with jobs in security, movies, etc. That’s certainly how it’s been up until now and how I expect it to be for quite some time to come. I love doing what I do. Now how many people can honestly say that? Most get up every morning hating what they do, day in and day out and are just waiting until they can retire and actually start ‘living’. Fortunately for me, since 11 years of age, I’ve been ‘living’ my passion nonstop. Have there been ups and downs? Of course, but overall, it’s been pretty damn great and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

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Film Star and Bodyguard – Richard Norton Interview Part 2

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Film Star and Bodyguard – Richard Norton Interview P.2!

Part two of this incredible interview with Richard Norton, martial artist, film star and bodyguard! Enjoy! As always please share, subscribe and like to support the site 😀

You have experience protecting some of the big names in show business, such as The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, James Taylor and David Bowie. How did that opportunity come about and what did you learn from the experience?

It came about again through Bob Jones. I was working the doors since I was a teenager in the clubs of Melbourne, so I obviously got a lot of experience through this. In early 1970, a local entrepreneur called Paul Dainty rang us up at the club and asked if we’d be interested in looking after The Rolling Stones. So of course we said yes and that’s how the Bodyguard work and touring started. As far as longevity in bodyguard work, that really came from word of mouth within the industry. It’s not something you send your resume in for and get a gig. Its more someone like a David Bowie speaking to another artist and saying, “Yeah, Richard is the best in the business and if you want personal security, then that’s the guy you need”. So it’s the word of mouth and recommendation of guys like David or a Linda Ronstadt, or a Mick Fleetwood that gets you your next gig with whatever next big act is out there. As far as bodyguard work it self, there weren’t really that many violent situations when I look at the 25 years of being a body guard, as it’s really more about the pre-emptive side of being aware of your environment and sensing the potential for a violent confrontation and hopefully avoiding it before it kicks off. For example, in a concert setting, it’s about the setup of the security personnel and where you place them before the band even hit the stage. I always saw myself as really the last line of defence, and even then, it’s all about the de-escalation of a situation before it becomes violent, as the last thing someone like a Mick Jagger would want is their bodyguard to kick the crap out of a fan! Not good publicity for them. A lot of the band members would often joke with me in the tour bus when travelling to and from gig’s, saying ‘Oh come on when do we get to see you do your thing?! I remember having a funny conversation with Danny Kortchmar, a guitarist with James Taylor, who was saying after a few beers on our tour bus. ‘Come on, I play guitar; you see me playing every night, Russ plays drums and you see him play every night, so when the hell are we going to see you punch someone! I’d laugh and point out that I knew that that’s the last thing you’d actually want me to do! Again, of course there was some violence, but I don’t really like talking about it as it glorifies it and wasn’t, at least for me as a Martial Artist, what the job was all about. I always said that the best security was when you didn’t even know you had it. Having said that, it’s a very different world now to when I was doing security, sadly due to the epidemic of drugs like Ice and Crack etc. I mean violence has truly just gone to a whole new and disgusting level. There are also CCTV cameras everywhere you go now too, so you’re always in the spotlight and you can’t just flippantly go the physical route like in the old days, as you’re so often going to end up on film as evidence and end up with your day in court. Then your whole life can change forever.

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You’ve also worked with some massive names in the film industry such as Jackie Chan and Chuck Norris, so gain, let’s just talk about how that came about and what it was like!

The meeting of Chuck Norris and consequently my movie career began with Bob going over to America and asking Chuck to come out to Australia as a guest and do some demonstrations for some Zen Do Kai Kick Boxing events we were holding in different states in Oz. This was in 1978.  So Chuck came out and as it turned out, I was also demonstrating on the same card in front of maybe 4000 people at a place called, Festival Hall. Anyway, from the first time we met, Chuck and I just got on so well from the get go and he basically said that if I was ever in California, to look him up and we’d do some training. So obviously, for a kid from the suburbs of Melbourne, Australia, this was like a huge wow moment! So a year later, I was working in Australia as bodyguard for one of the biggest rock and rollers of the time, Linda Ronstadt, and she asked me to move over to America and work with her full time. So off I went to California, amazingly after a lot of hesitation. So there I was, living and working with Linda, and of course the first person I called when I got there was Chuck! Incredibly, true to his word, he invited me round to his house to train. We would go on to form an incredible friendship and train every morning in his house for years to come, doing hours of kicking routines and fitness marathons and everything else, martial Arts related. It’s through Chuck and his many influential MA friends that I got the introduction to Jackie Chan. Chuck was so well liked and respected and kindly opened doors for me that I could have only dreamed about, had I not met and befriended him. So that’s how my movie career really began! I can’t thank Chuck enough for giving me the opportunity to meet some of the greatest Martial Artists in the world and help me get the skills I have today! Back to the start in movies, when I first arrived in California and started training with Chuck, he was in the very early stages for his film, `The Octagon`, and because of my demonstrations in Australia, he was well aware of my skills with Okinawan weapons. So there was a main bad guy character in ‘The Octagon’ by the name of ‘Kyo.’ So he asked me to accept that role! It’s funny, because the character was originally meant to be Asian, hence the reason for the crimson headdress in the movie to hide the fact I was in fact a blonde Aussie! So I ended up playing ‘Kyo’ and also helping Chuck’s brother, Aaron in choreographing a lot of the fights. In fact just four of us did all the ninja work in the movie. My claim to fame in `The Octagon` was I died eight times in that movie, as every time someone went splat in a black uniform it was probably me! So that was the start of my movie career! Pat Johnson, who was a partner of Chuck’s back then and who had worked with Jackie on `The Big Brawl` suggested to Jackie that I would be good to have as the bad guy in one of his movie’s, so a few years later I got a call from Jackie and his team and that’s how I ended up working on three of his movies. It was all a matter of circumstance really; I didn’t go to the states planning on getting into the movies, but, as fate had it, that’s what happened and here we are, some 70 movie’s later. Not a bad way to make a living, eh?

When did you decide to make the jump from stunt man to choreographer? Was it a conscious decision or just a natural progression?

Yes, I guess it did just kind of happen, of course helped by my Martial Arts background. I think I worked out, after being in the industry for some time, that as an actor, you’re kind of a product with a short shelf life. You either get overexposed, or you’re not that good, or there are no roles that suit your look or whatever. I mean loved being in front of the camera, but was realistic enough to know it wouldn’t last forever. Also, a lot of the types of movies I was doing back then they just don’t make anymore. I also realised that advancing age was going to reduce the roles I was going to get offered. So I thought it would be prudent and smart for me to learn what it’s like being behind the camera and, as it turned out, that was a good move for me. On `Mad Max` I had an acting role, but I was mainly working as fight coordinator. Now I’ve just been hired as Fight Coordinator on another huge movie in 2015, so it all doesn’t look like stopping anytime soon, thank goodness. Honestly, movies for me are primarily about economics and earning enough to make a living and allow myself more time to spend in the Arts, doing what I love doing most, and that’s living my passion.

LOOK OUT TOMORROW FOR THE THIRD AND FINAL PART!

Film Star and Bodyguard – Richard Norton Interview Part 1!

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Film Star and Bodyguard – Richard Norton Interview P.1!

He’s worked with names such as Chuck Norris and Jackie Chan, and was the bodyguard to The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, James Taylor and many others! He’s also a fantastic martial artist and someone that those interested in the martial arts can hope to aspire to be like in our own training.

Also a really nice guy who took the time out of his massively hectic schedule to give me the interview! Here’s part one of my interview with Richard Norton for The Martial View!

Thanks for taking the interview Richard! Your career in the martial arts has been a shining example to those involved in martial arts. You’ve worked with some famous names such as Jackie Chan and Chuck Norris, and protected the likes of The Rolling Stones and Fleetwood Mac! Can you remember what initially led you into starting martial arts, and how you felt walking into your first class?

Yeah, I’ve often been asked this, and looking back it certainly wasn’t due to the fact I was being beaten up or that it was a rough neighbourhood that I lived in. I was certainly attracted to martial arts from a young age, but who knows why! I remember seeing ads on the back of comic books talking about Judo, and there was just something quite mystical about it and I was intrigued by this oriental art. Then, as it happened, there was a kid who moved into a house opposite ours where I lived in Croydon, which is a suburb of Melbourne, and as it turned out, he was disappearing 2-3 times a week. So one day I said, “Oh Morris where are you going”? So he told me he was learning Judo and I was like, “Wow I want to come too”! So I went along the next night and was absolutely awe struck and loved the idea of it! Now one initial problem I had was that I was quite skinny and small as an 11 year old and started of being a bit like cannon fodder for the older kids in the class! The Sensei, John Burge, was wonderful and very caring though and kept inspiring me to keep at it. I used to practice in the back yard with my mates as I was always very physical as a kid, wrestling and boxing, as most kids do I’d imagine, and now we added Judo into the mix. Then one day, another school friend, John Rowe, who was also in our Judo class and who was learning Karate out of the book, `This Is Karate` by Masutatsu Oyama, excitedly told me that there was a karate school opening up near where we lived. So off I went for the opening night. The style of Karate was Goju Kai and was being taught by Sensei Tino Ceberano. I remember the class did a demonstration of basic H pattern  Kata, or forms and a bit of Jiyu Kumite, which was light contact sparring. Well, I remember that being an incredible light-bulb moment for me and I decided right then and there, that Karate was what I wanted to do with my life. So that was when the whole journey of immersion and passion for the Martial Arts started started. I still think back to those early days and truly believe that martial arts were what I was meant to do with my life, esoteric as it sounds. Pretty much everything good I’ve experienced in my life, from travelling the world as a personal Body Guard and working on movie sets for over 35 years, has come as a result of just wanting to be the best Martial Artist I could be. My entire life has revolved around the martial arts; I mean where a lot of other people get jobs and set patterns in their life and then discover and try and fit their respective training in, the opposite was true for me; I made my life fit around the dojo and training and that’s how it all started and continues to this day.

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So from there I presume you just developed your Karate further and then this led to the Zen Do Kai system? Can you talk me through this?

Yes, Zen Do Kai started through an association one of my oldest friends and mentors, Bob Jones, who was also a student of Tino Ceberano and Goju Kai Karate Do. At the time we met, Bob owned a security company and was involved with providing security personnel for most of the clubs and bars of Melbourne was already incredibly skilled in reality based fighting and the ways of ‘street’ combat. It was Bob who wanted to initiate his own style of ‘Combat effective’ Martial Arts and wante­d me to partner up with him. So that led to the formation of the Zen Do Kai Karate schools which started in 1970. It was still based in the Goju system, but our motto was ‘The Best of Everything in Progression’, so I would say it was one of the first eclectic type of schools in Australia where aspects of different styles of Martial Arts were incorporated, rather than being purely based on one system. If we thought a technique from another style had some combat effectiveness, we integrated it into our Zen Do Kai system. We had boxing, Judo and wrestling along with the Goju karate, so it was in fact a very early version of MMA. Remember, MMA means ‘mixing Martial Arts, not just the sport version we know of as ‘The UFC’. A lot of the early students in our school were professional bouncers and incredibly tough and seasoned street fighters, so it suited us to pressure test different MA techniques and try to discover what was real or what was just theoretical. Not taking it away from the esoteric or theoretical aspect of some of our martial arts, but it was important for us and our students to know what combat techniques would work in the real world and not just in the safe confines of the Dojo. So it was obviously through Bob and Zen Do Kai that that I got involved in doing security work on doors, which led to personal bodyguard work.

Obviously self-defence is a tricky concept and lots of school claim to teach self-defence but are criticised for teaching unrealistic techniques that only work in a dojo setting, or criticised for having no real life experience to draw upon. What are your thoughts on the principles of effective self-defence training and the teaching of self-defence?

I understand the dilemma of a martial arts instructor with no reality based experience trying to teach actual reality based street techniques when they’ve never had a real fight in their lives and I would of course never encourage anyone to go out and involve themselves in street violence, just to get that experience. But having said that, I think that if you are really learning reality based self-defence, it’s important to learn from someone that really been on the front lines and has life experience, as it is different from the Dojo environment. In the dojo, you’re in a cotton wool sort of environment; there are rules and protocols that protect you, whereas in the street there are no such parameters. The fear that a life or death street encounter brings is obviously quite confronting, and as a result, I think it is essential to learn such street techniques from someone that understands the effects of fear and adrenaline, accelerated pulse rates and how all of those factors affect you physiologically and dramatically change your bodies ability to deliver complex moves learnt in the Dojo. So you need someone that can talk the students through these pre fight feelings, so at the very least, if, God forbid, the student is involved in a street altercation or whatever, he can maybe can maybe recall these lessons from a street experienced instructor and realise what’s going on, physiologically in his body, before the actual physical part even kicks off. I mean anyone that’s experienced real combat knows that quite often the legs start shaking, the heart rate goes up and you at best lose cognitive ability and fine and complex motor skills and go straight to gross motor skills. All of that is important to understand when you teach as so many of the complex moves we learn in traditional arts are okay in traditional and safe sport environments, but won’t necessarily work when you are really confronted with violence and basically scared shitless. You need to get to the fundamentals, the one or two strikes you can use in a pre-emptive situation that will hopefully allow you to survive a street fight. A friend of mine, Sensei Paul Cale, who has incidentally come under Team Norton and who is one of our most decorated military vets, having had multiple tours of Afghanistan etc and developed his own combat system, called Kinetic Combat System, says it drives him nuts seeing the amount of ‘Combat Instructors’ who advertise themselves as teaching the military, special forces etc.  As he says, most of these ‘Reality Based Experts’ have never ever been in the service, let alone eve a real street fight, and yet they’re teaching real world knife and gun weapons defence. So, even for me, if I wanted to further my realistic defence in terms of lethal weapons, I’d go to someone like Paul, as I know he’s been there for real. I mean teach knife defence now, but I’m very honest and say that I believe that these techniques will be effective in reality, but it’s still theory to a huge extent, as how the hell would I know when I’ve never been in a real knife fight. Bit different when the blades are real and not made out of rubber. Lol