99 ways to get a student – Matthew Chapman

14910444 362755440737882 2542852182441998814 n 99 ways to get a student   Matthew Chapman

I’ve just finished Matthew Chapman’s new book `99 ways to get a student`and wow am I impressed. I was expecting good things I have read Matt’s other books both on business for martial arts school owners, as well as his excellent book on how to win your first MMA Fight and I wasn’t left disappointed. Clear concise and with action points you can take straight into your marketing plan to build your martial arts school!

It’s not surprising to see why Matt has a successful school after reading his books due to his thoughtful and insightful ways of getting a new student through the door and retaining them. His latest book lists over 99 ways to gain a new student focusing on both online and offline marketing. Online marketing is gone into in great detail, from SEO tricks to get you ranking higher on google, to online offers and promotions to get people through the door and enjoying the fun of martial arts. His offline content is just as good, with fantastic ways to gain a student from working with local businesses to establish yourself as the local expert in martial arts, to billboards or referral programs. All action points that can be implemented straight away!

I started reading the book then immediately stopped, grabbed a pen and paper and began reading again as I knew this was definitely a book where lots of notes would be taken to put into my monthly marketing plan. I recommend this book as an absolute must for anyone looking to grow their martial arts school or learn more about the martial arts business side. Easy to read, even easier to implement, this book is gold dust for those looking to step up their marketing.

Grab Matthew Chapman’s 99 ways to get a student here: bit.ly/99newstudents

How students can inspire their instructors

martial arts 291049 1280 1024x768 How students can inspire their instructors

Many people go to a martial arts instructor wanting to learn a new skill, improve their fitness, and learn to defend themselves or simply to try something new. While the student learns the skills, movement and philosophy of that chosen art, what many don’t realise is that the instructor is also learning a whole lot from their students. So, as a result of that it’s time to flip thinking on its head and highlight a few ways students can teach and inspire their instructors.

1) They can teach different teaching methods

People learn in different ways and a common mistake for instructors can be that they teach every persona that walks into class the same way. People enter into the martial arts for different reasons, learn in different ways and pick up things at different paces. It can be difficult accommodating everyone in a class of 30 people, but every effort should be made to. Some learn from seeing a technique and analysing it, others learn from hearing how the technique or strike works, and some need to simply give it a go therefore learning by touch. Students can be a fantastic way of improving the teaching skills of the instructor, especially if there is a wide variation of learning methods within the class. A good instructor should be able to tell people’s preferred method of learning and adapt to it through observation, which is another key trait students can teach!

2) Observation skills

Observation and awareness skills are important aspects of the martial art or self defence. Being aware of your surroundings and aware of any potential issues are essential to self defence and even in a regular class, being aware of the people around you is a great habit to get in to. But how aware are we as instructors? Can you tell if someone is struggling or not picking up the material well? Do they feel uncomfortable with the person they’re training with? Can you spot the signs they’re ready to give up and has their attendance gone down? Being aware of every potential threat on the street is great but unless you sideline as a drug dealer, your instances of being placed in a violent situation are hopefully fairly few and far between. Far more important is your ability to be aware of the people you are around and in tune with their feelings, body language and mood, both in training and general life. Teaching your students can be a great way of developing this and if you have a high drop-out rate, maybe it’s time to re-evaluate your own awareness skills!
In addition to this, students can be a great way to help you develop awareness about yourself and how you are interacting and transmitting your style. Awareness of your students is a must have skill, but awareness of yourself is also crucial, and students (especially kids) will be the first ones to let you know if you’re being inconsistent or chatting shit!

3) They can test your skill and knowledge

Students can sometimes ask some pretty tricky questions and call you out if they ever think you’re bullshitting. A beginner can sometimes ask the simplest question but it will leave you stumped! Your knowledge could be vast and have the Dalai Lama scratching his head, but if you can’t explain the reason for something as simple as your stance, it’s all irrelevant!
Your students can also test you physically. I’m around 5ft 6 and about 72kg, but some of my students are over 6ft and over 16 stone! Some have door work experience and so if something isn’t working for them, they’ll let you know! Demoing with different students not only helps them grasp the technique better, but also allows you to work with people of different sizes and weights to test your techniques.

4) They can be an example to you

Do you have that one student who is always early to class, always enthusiastic and always trying their best? That’s the inspiration. Instructor’s are human and will sometimes have a bad day and not be in the best mood to teach. We’re imperfect. It’s important not to let your day enter the class however and leave any trouble back at home for a few hours while you instruct. This is where we can find inspiration from our students who always turn up with a smile, willing to help and enthusiastic to help you pack away after class. These are the students who will eventually become instructors themselves and run their own classes and be inspired by their own students. Keep them!

So there we have it, 4 reasons why students can sometimes be the ones teaching the instructors a thing or two. As instructors we can sometimes become so focussed on transmitting knowledge that we forget to take information in ourselves. Your students can be a perfect way of doing this. So learn, enjoy, and instruct with passion!

Black Belt Biz – A review

51FgvnDnLgL. SX340 BO1204203200  206x300 Black Belt Biz   A review

Last Sunday I was lucky enough to attend a Martial Arts business seminar with the the fantastic Matthew Chapman. I’ve been lucky enough to know Matt for a couple of years now first training in one of his MMA workshops in 2014. Since then I’ve followed and been impressed by his MittMaster series as well as his books `100 Essential Pad Drill for Kickboxing and MMA`, `How to win your first MMA fight`and `Black Belt Biz`. I was therefore really excited when I saw he was hosting a business seminar not too far away from me at the fantastic `Twin Tigers`facility in Scunthorpe and jumped at the chance to attend both the catch up with Matt for the upcoming `Martial Masters`book & also to get some tips on building my own business here in Lincoln.

download Black Belt Biz   A review

People have varying opinions on making money with the martial arts, with the frankly idiotic view some people have that martial arts should just be taught for the love of doing it, not money. I disagree with this wholeheartedly and think that as long as an excellent standard of instruction is maintained, martial arts should be treated the same as any other professional service. I now run a martial arts class under Defence Lab in Lincoln and hope to make this full time as soon as possible. For this I need money, simple as. The more time I have training, teaching and learning martial arts, the more it will benefit my students and so I agree with Matt when he says that the best martial artists he has seen are the ones that have gone full time and can dedicate themselves to it.

51xCg4UsZiL. AC UL320 SR222320  208x300 Black Belt Biz   A review

Matt’s business seminars aim to grow your school through marketing & retaining your students – an area often neglected by martial artists who hope for students to come into their class yet do nothing to recruit. A very old-school mentality. Matt has a successful school with the Masters Academy, and is a published author and now creator of the MittMaster series popular all over the world. Matt knows his stuff 100%. His workshop was personable, informative and I came away with some fantastic ideas to implement in my school, hopefully to get me to the point of eventually becoming a full time martial arts instructor which is a dream I’ve had for many years now.

Matt provided tailored information specific to what we wanted help with, offered personalised advice and really took the time to get to know where you were with the business and where you wanted to be. This wasn’t a sales drive by Matt, looking to earn a bit of money by teaching a half-arsed seminar, I believe he genuinely wants to help martial artists succeed and spread brilliant martial arts to a wider audience. Through his ideas in terms of business, I also believe he’ll help you do this and get you to where you want to be.

12742543 10153947126732070 3125534189767841013 n Black Belt Biz   A review

The seminar included handouts that could be taken home, along with a copy of Matt’s book `Black Belt Biz`which in itself if an invaluable book for those looking to build up a martial arts business. We also get 6 months of support from Matt who has always been on hand to answer any questions I have asked him in the past and am sure will in the future. I came away from the workshop enthusiastic and ready to implement the ideas.

This is a review guys and I’m always honest with my reviews on here. Matt is a great guy and isn’t in martial arts to make a quick buck and get out. He has a great pedigree in martial arts and wants to help great martial artists fulfil their potential and have successful martial arts schools where they can dedicate their lives to training and teaching people who will ultimately continue that martial art on.

So would I recommend his course? Yes. If you are struggling to recruit or retain your students I think Matt can definitely help. If you’re looking for new ideas to recruit and get people through the door, again I think Matt can help. It was a great course and one that I’m definitely glad I went on! Worth the early Sunday morning and one I would go on again.

To find out more, check out Matt’s Facebook group here

`No Lie Blades` Review

images `No Lie Blades` Review`No Lie Blades` Review

Hello people! Sorry for the delays in posting but it’s been a pretty busy few weeks with one thing and another! Time for a new post though and today we are looking at the `No Lie Blades`, a wicked piece of kit designed to test you skills with a knife and show just how hard it is to defend one!

The `no lie blade` was kindly provided by Anton St James of the Master’s Academy in Plymouth. I ordered it on the Wednesday and it arrived on the Thursday – how’s that for customer service?! The blade itself comes in two editions – single sided or double sided. I received the double edged knife packaged nicely with 4 lipstick like markers used to mark the felt edging of the knife to see where you’ve been stabbed and slashed…. play time!

Knife crime is becoming an ever increasing problem in society if we look at the media. Every day we seem to see a new story about a child bringing a knife to school, or someone getting stabbed after an argument occurs. Therefore for anyone looking at realistic self defence training, knife training is definitely an area of study. This being said, one YouTube search of knife defence will show you just how much is out there in terms of ideas and principles of knife defence – some good, some bad. I’ve never and hope never to be involved in a knife fight and so have no experience of what would realistically work. This is where the `no lie blade` adds an element of realism in to your training, allowing you to see exactly where you get slashed and stabbed as you try to defend. The blade is a realistic size and weight and the grips fits comfortably in the hand allowing for fast slashes and thrusts and a realistic training session. The lipstick dye is easy to apply and clearly shows where you’ve been slashed. For someone who has very limited training in knife defence, it was certainly a wake up call and eye opener…. I died…. a lot! The knife is tough enough to withstand some pretty heavy damage as I tried breaking it after we played to see how tough it was to no avail, but not so much so that it properly hurts when you get slashed and stabbed.

11215749 10153604615822070 4538928483950256675 n 165x300 `No Lie Blades` Review

For those looking to add an element of realism in to their knife defence and self defence training I would highly recommend the `no lie blade` for its simplicity and ease of use. It will add a new dimension of realism to your training and improve your knife defence skills simply through experimentation of when you get slashed and when you don’t. Overall, an awesome piece of kit that I highly recommend! NLB courses also run throughout the year which I have heard only good things about! Contact Anton St James on Facebook or www.martialartsplymouth.co.uk for more information on the `no lie blade` and go to www.trainingknives.net for the `no lie blade` official site!

10440959 10152698744630796 2583123401504400395 n `No Lie Blades` Review

 

The changing face of experts….

11347895 10152976291547144 360259654 o 300x300 The changing face of experts....

The changing face of experts…

Be honest with yourself, are you an expert in self defence or martial arts? In the age of digital media and knowledge at our fingertips, more and more so called experts are coming out of the woodwork, giving “expert” advice on martial arts, self defence and combat sports in general. There is a whole host of information out there on fighting styles, legality of self defence and mixed martial arts take-downs and submissions and with one google search you can find out what you can legally do to defend yourself, how to choke someone out, and how to throw a half decent left hook. The problem comes when they then think they can argue and advise people who have been out pioneering and testing this stuff in real life for decades!

Anyone can say and post anything on the internet, and this is especially the case in martial arts. A YouTube search of `Martial Arts` will bring up millions of results, some great, some fricking awful but all with someone’s own interpretation of self defence, martial arts or combat sports. When this interpretation is based on experience, knowledge, blood, sweat and tears, fantastic, we need people to push the boundaries and evolve with the times. When this interpretation is based on a few books bought on eBay, and a few hours spent watching some MMA highlights, the interpretation lacks some credibility. What seems funny is that it is often the ones with the least real life experience of training or fighting, that seem most vocal in their interpretation of it, probably due to the fact they overestimate their own ability and the genuine skill and depth of knowledge from others.

Martial arts and self defence require years of study. You learn the basics, you explore the techniques, you make the techniques your own, keeping the principles from the basics. You then interpret the techniques, expand or narrow them down and then teach to others. It seems sometimes people tend to go step 1 to teaching others straight away, posting videos, advertising events and claiming expert level knowledge. Anyone can write a book on a subject. Anyone can teach a class on a subject. All it takes is a bit of research. What makes the difference is the interaction with the students and the way it is presented however. The individual knowing only the basics will be narrow in their approach, teaching a few techniques or principles and that’s it. There will be no individual feedback, no scenario training, no allowances for different sizes or strengths, no question and answer session. The knowledge will be one dimensional and lack substance. The only people who will learn from this is those who know less than you. Put up against someone with some knowledge and you’re in a proverbial creek without a paddle.

Too much information is available today especially in the case of martial arts, many of which have long traditions, cultures and principles that can’t be learnt in a matter of weeks. Looking at the source of the information is crucial. What’s their background? Do they claim to hold a 12th degree black belt in 72 different styles of killer Kung Fu and once kicked Chuck Norris in the face? If so, call bullshit. This type of filtering down of the arts dilutes the whole process and lowers the bar for all involved to the point where you get 4th degree black belts who couldn’t punch their way out of a paper bag. Loads of people know wayyyy more about martial arts and self defence than I do and when they speak, I shut up and pay attention. They are the ones who keep quiet and wait to be asked their opinion on a topic, not jump at the first opportunity to prove their knowledge and skill. They are the ones who offer a range of answers for a particular question, never black and white answers.

They are the ones worth learning from and dedicating your time and efforts to.

MAUnity will be launching soon. It will showcase these people. These people who are experts in their field and have tried and tested their methods. It will be a webshow with a different style of the week each week showcasing a style of martial art of self defence, along with background and clips. It will include reviews, expert tutorials, interviews and anything else we can think of along the way! It’s taking a lot of work to get PERFECT so bear with us but it will be here. The Martial View will become MAUnity in the hope of being a place of genuine knowledge for sport, self defence and traditional martial arts. I’ll be the host, which I apologize for as I have a face made for radio, but the content will be great with some top quality martial artists and self defence instructors already on board. It’s coming!

Want to be involved? Get in touch!

Book Review – Tales from the Western Generation by Matthew Apsokardu

untitled 231x300 Book Review   Tales from the Western Generation by Matthew Apsokardu

Tales from the Western Generation by Matthew Apsokardu

So a friend of mine and fellow blogger Matthew Apsokardu from www.ikigaiway.com asked me to write a review of his new book that has just been released on Amazon and I was more than happy to do so! Free book for me if nothing else :P. Those who follow the facebook group will know I have just ordered a shit ton of self defence and martial arts books so look out for some more reviews soon, as well as a recommended reading page!

I know nothing about the history of Karate, or much about the history of most martial arts to be honest and in general find it pretty dull to read about, but Matthew’s book was the exception! I was actually surprised to find myself really enjoying it, learning about the historical and cultural changes that led to the evolution of Karate as it is practiced today from the pioneers in the early 1900s to the tournament scene in the 1960s and 70s.

What really makes the book is the interviews conducted however with pioneers, mavericks and trendsetters of the martial arts who have set the tone for those that practice martial arts today. The book is incredibly easy to read, informative and enjoyable and I would highly recommend it to anyone interested in the history of martial arts or martial arts in general. This book is a must have on the shelf for any serious martial artist.

To purchase the book, please follow this link – http://www.amazon.com/Tales-Western-Generation-Stories-Firsthand/dp/0692436545/ref=la_B00XZSFAFY_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1432176686&sr=1-1

or alternatively follow http://westernkarate.com for kindle copies!

Well done Matt, great book!

 

The Martial View is changing!!

11347895 10152976291547144 360259654 o 300x300 The Martial View is changing!!

Okay, I know I said the changes were coming in the next few months, but hey I’m going to announce it now! THE MARTIAL VIEW IS CHANGING!! In the next few weeks The Martial View will complete its change into `MAUnity`!! For those who don’t know about the change yet, MAUnity is the evolution of The Martial View, a group dedicated to forwarding the Martial Arts Industry and promoting collaboration and cohesion within the Martial Arts Community! This has been over 6 months in the making and we have some really exciting articles, interviews and webinars coming your way! Not forgetting our new weekly webshow, MAUnity Style of the Week, where we showcase a different sports, self defence or traditional style every single week! We have had a MASSIVE reception already with over 50 different instructors from different styles interviewed for the show! I’m excited and hope you all are too! This is about working together so everyone here already supporting The Martial View will instantly become part of the `MAUnity Community` (Little rhyme there too) and will get to be part of the new movement. Let’s work together and show everyone why we love martial arts and self defence so much!! Thank you for your support so far and it’s time to move The Martial View on to bigger and better things!! Onwards and Upwards, seeing the big picture!

Signs you’re doing martial arts right….

images Signs youre doing martial arts right....

Signs you’re doing martial arts right….

So originally I was going to write a blog post on signs you are, or are becoming a McDojo, the McDojo that never compete, never travel to other clubs, internally promote and have 10th Dan 10 year olds….but then someone made a great point that this has been done to death, and that bad schools dont care they’re bad schools, they just care about making money and churning out Grandmaster Shihan Sensei Ninja Turtle toddlers! So let’s focus on the positives, signs you’re doing it right, signs you’re teaching martial arts/self defence as they’re meant to be taught! In the future I’d love to travel round and see some of your guys schools, do some training with you and a little bio for the blog so let me know if you’d be interested!

5 – You yourself as an instructor develop

Self development in my eyes is key to running a great martial arts school. If you yourself are constantly developing and learning in order to get better in your field, I think you’re on to a winner. This keeps your students up to date with the latest, cements your place within the martial arts community and keeps you on your toes and not getting too complacent. I’m sure we can all agree that none of us will ever reach perfection in our chosen field and that martial arts are a lifelong pursuit! Keep developing!

4 – Competitions

For those that teach arts with a competitive edge, what better way to see how you and your students are doing than by letting them compete if they feel fit and ready? Martial arts are about practice and cooperation, but a great way of testing what you’re doing is with an uncooperative partner such as in a competitive arena. Even if you do an art that isn’t competitive such as Aikido, competitions can still exist between schools to up everyone’s game and to see how you compare to those around you.

3 – You get students with minimal advertising, pushing etc

The best advertisement is word of mouth, if you’re doing a great job with your school, people will hear about it both in the martial arts world and those looking to dip their toe in to it and try new things.

2 – You cross train and bring in visiting instructors

Martial arts are a community. We’ve discussed before the internal politics and general bitchiness that can surround the martial arts, but where you have people, politics will exist. Cross training ups your own game and knowledge, gives your students another angle on their training, and helps you build contacts within the community. The same goes for visiting instructors. A change of pace and instructor for a seminar or weekend can give your students a new outlook and new passion and drive as well as again, networking.

1 – Your students

Your students are probably the best test as to how you are doing. Are they buzzing at the end of every class? Do they get involved in discussions, go home and research, look at YouTube videos etc? Do they travel to seminars with other instructors? These are all great signs that you are really into what you are doing, and a good sign you’re doing the right thing! It’s true that a teacher’s ability is reflected in their students, and if you have a group of passionate, dedicated and skilled students, chances are you’re doing a great job! Pretty simple right?

NFPS LTD – Chat with Mark Dawes

nfps NFPS LTD   Chat with Mark Dawes

Chat with Mark Dawes

So in preparation for my review of the BTEC Level 3 Self Defence course I attended which will be published next week, we spoke to Mark Dawes of NFPS Ltd about how his company began, what it aims to accomplish and why there’s a need for it! Enjoy!

How it All Began!

I started teaching self-defence back in 1988 on the back of running a martial arts school.  This was at the request of the local police and local crime prevention panel, who wanted self-defence courses for local people and local businesses.

The concept was to provide a two-hour session after work one evening a week for six weeks, culminating in twelve hours training in self-defence.  This was the amount of time people could realistically commit to, when having to balance their work, family life and other everyday commitments.

Now this was a different concept to teaching a martial art, where someone would attend a class twice or three times a week for three to five years to get a black belt.

So the first question planted a seed in my mind. Do people need to train for three to five years to be competent to defend yourself?

The next ’light-bulb’ moment for me came when I was asked by a woman on one of these self-defence evenings, if I could teach her something that she could teach to her son. He wanted to learn self-defence but who was too scared to attend a class because he was being bullied and had very low self-esteem and self-confidence, and I thought, yes, why not?

If self-defence is a ‘common law right’ of every person, why do we have to elevate someone to the dizzy heights of  ‘instructor’ to be ‘allowed’ to teach? Why can’t a mum simply show her son what to do? Now of course in today’s health and safety conscious world we need to apply good health and safety practices to what we teach, but that shouldn’t take three to five years! It could be done in a day or two.

It also made me realise something else (my mind was now similar to an illuminated fairground as one light-bulb moment sparked off another). A lot of people who probably need to or want to learn to know how to defend themselves, do not attend courses because:

  1.  They are probably not very confident and have low self-esteem, and
  2.  They are probably at the low end of the fitness spectrum, and are not very technically (in a physical skills sense) proficient.

This means that the people who really need the help are possibly not the people who actually attend courses.  So wouldn’t it be great if we could teach those that do attend to go back and teach these very people?

The next ‘wake-up’ call came when I was asked what reasonable force meant. My co-tutor (a police officer who was running these two hour sessions) and I had been telling the people we were training that as long as the force they used was ‘reasonable’ they would be okay. Then, at the end of one of the sessions a woman on the course asked us to explain what ’reasonable force’ meant.Then apart from giving a few weak examples (basically ones that we made up on the spur of the moment, to avoid any embarrassment) neither my police colleague nor I could legitimately define what ‘reasonable force’ actually meant.

945705 10151419923709499 454276922 n NFPS LTD   Chat with Mark Dawes

This ‘wake-up call’ was a realisation that people didn’t just want techniques; they really wanted to know what they were legally allowed to do. In short, they wanted to know that if they used what we were showing them, they would be acting legally. In essence what we were doing by majoring on teaching techniques, was akin to teaching someone to drive but not teaching them the Highway Code. This was confirmed much later when I carried out a large survey at a north London hospital, when we asked nurses on personal safety courses what they wanted to know. They all said they wanted to know how far they could actually go in defending themselves, and others and to do that they had to know what ‘reasonable force’ actually meant.

The realisation that was dawning on me was that techniques alone aren’t enough. This was because the evidence shows that people will not use something that is too complicated simply because they will not be able to recall what to do when under pressure. Also, if people do not understand the law in relation to ‘reasonable force’ then how will they be able to know what they are legally allowed to do and that can create hesitation and fear. They also wanted to be taught simple and effective techniques that were easy to learn, easy to remember and which would work if required.

At that moment, I had what I can only describe as one of those ‘epiphany’ moments.

I suddenly realised that the reason that we were all teaching a progressive course, that taught more and more complex techniques as people progressed through it, was because we (the instructors) wanted to look good / make a good impression in front of our ‘audience’ by being able to do what they couldn’t. Another motivator for some other trainers too (which one guy told me about) was that if someone actually used something in self-defence and hurt someone, he would have a ‘get-out’ clause by being able to say that they didn’t use the technique the way we had taught them. In short, the training was about the trainer/s, not the students and it didn’t make trainers accountable or responsible for what they were teaching.

So the challenge was set.

If I really wanted to help people I had to give them the information they needed to answer their questions, which, in summary were:

  1.  Can you teach me something that I can use that is quick and easy to learn as well as being effective?
  2.  Can you teach me what to do within a legally correct framework, so I know exactly what I am legally allowed and not allowed to do and how far I am allowed to go?
  3.  Can you teach me something that is so easy to remember and is so effective but which would be easy for me to teach to someone else, without having to train for three-five years to do so?

From then on the ‘Bash & Dash’ course was conceived and the first one was a huge success.

Over the years the course has developed based around a simple mantra that I keep at the forefront of my mind which helps keep me on point. That mantra is:

“If a forty-eight year old woman came up to me and asked me to teach her something so that she could either: a) defend herself and her family, or b) enable her to teach someone else in her family, because she or someone in her family was scared that they were going to be attacked later on that same day, could I do it?”

If the answer is no, I am not teaching self-defence, I am teaching something else.

Today in 2015, twenty-seven years on, our BTEC Level 3 Advanced Self-Defence Instructor Award Course follows those same steadfast principles, which hold as true today as they did all those years ago.

The reason we eventually developed it into a BTEC Course was because of another ‘light-bulb’ moment.

There are many courses taught by many different people. Some are good, some are bad and some are indifferent, so it is difficult for someone to know what to look for when they are looking for training. However, all of these courses have one thing in common which is that the instructors, in the main, actually want to help people and are motivated by a desire to keep people safe.

However, all of these courses have one other thing in common too. None of them teach to a recognised national vocational standard that involves a structured process of learning and assessment with audit trails and internal and external verification processes, and this is what makes our BTEC Level 3 Advanced Self-Defence Instructor Award Course different.

What our course does is provide an instructor with an approach to teaching, based on a structured process of learning and assessment that is legally correct and health and safety compliant.

This provides any prospective student with the safeguard of knowing that their instructor has gone though a formally recognised process and has attained a qualification written to an Awarding Body standard.

It also provides the instructor with the freedom to teach what they like as long as it meets the three principles listed above.

In summary our BTEC Level 3 Advanced Self-Defence Instructor Award Course is not about us and it’s not about the instructor. It is about the people the instructors will teach.

What I learned twenty-seven years ago, which still holds true today, is that people need more than just physical techniques. They need information and they need answers to questions, that are stopping them reaching their full potential. Provide that and you liberate them and set them free to live a safe life.

00c5530 NFPS LTD   Chat with Mark Dawes

Mark Dawes.

25 March 2015.

5 Steps to improved Jiyu Waza fitness

1464610 10152069214817070 1811412865 n 300x287 5 Steps to improved Jiyu Waza fitness

5 steps to improved Jiyu Waza fitness

I’m sure everyone who does Aikido can relate to the fact that Jiyu Waza takes a special kind of fitness! I like to consider myself a fairly fit guy but after a few rounds of Jiyu Waza I’m pretty tired! I’ve known long distance runners, gymnasts and athletes be tired after one or two rounds! So what makes Jiyu Waza so tiring and how can we improve our endurance?

Firstly there’s the fact that it takes a certain kind of cardio-vascular endurance! You attack, get thrown, spring up and attack again. It’s dynamic, its athletic, and its tiring! Secondly there’s impact. Impact takes it out of you. You get thrown hard and the body tenses in order to prepare for the impact. You don’t breath correctly, you tense up in anticipation of the fall. You hold your breath as you meet the floor. You get tired! Thirdly, its not just tiring for the one receiving the fall, its tiring for the one applying the techniques! A difficult, stiff and inexperienced partner can make you tense and it can feel like throwing a sack of potatoes if the partner can’t yet fall correctly. Again this leads to fatigue! So what can we do about it?!

5 – Overall Fitness

This is pretty much a given, if you’re in reasonably good shape and have good muscular endurance as well as cardiovascular endurance, this is obviously going to help your jiyu waza! High intensity training where sprints are followed by periods of low intensity exercise are shown to be extremely effective in increasing cardio relatively quickly and is more effective than just running for miles and miles in terms of jiyu waza and martial arts in general. Jiyu waza is fast, dynamic and high intensity. Self defence situations are fast, dynamic and high intensity.

4 – Ukemi

Get comfortable falling. Simple as that, get comfortable falling for back falls, front falls, side falls, weird and wonderful angled falls. Just get comfortable falling. The more comfortable you are falling, the more your body will relax on the impact and the less fatigued you will become in both cardio and muscular.

3 – Know your techniques

Get comfortable practicing different techniques to use during jiyu waza and just repeatedly practice until you have a good “set list” of techniques at your disposal. The more comfortable with techniques, again the more relaxed you will be and the more you can focus on things like breathing, not trying to think of a technique to do!

2 – Breath!!

We’re all guilty of it. We tense up and we forget to breath! As Robert Mustard Shihan is fond of saying, its a well known secret of the martial arts that if you don’t breath, you die! Establish a pattern of breathing in through the nose and out through the mouth and you will notice an improvement in your endurance almost immediately in comparison to erratic breathing when you are panicking and tense.

1 – PRACTICE

So how do we get comfortable doing all these things?! Practice! Do rounds of jiyu waza, building up slowly as both the receiver and the thrower! Think about your breathing, the techniques you will use and the correct way to fall properly. Get a good training partner who wants to improve their jiyu waza too and get practicing. Enjoy!!