The changing face of experts….

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The changing face of experts…

Be honest with yourself, are you an expert in self defence or martial arts? In the age of digital media and knowledge at our fingertips, more and more so called experts are coming out of the woodwork, giving “expert” advice on martial arts, self defence and combat sports in general. There is a whole host of information out there on fighting styles, legality of self defence and mixed martial arts take-downs and submissions and with one google search you can find out what you can legally do to defend yourself, how to choke someone out, and how to throw a half decent left hook. The problem comes when they then think they can argue and advise people who have been out pioneering and testing this stuff in real life for decades!

Anyone can say and post anything on the internet, and this is especially the case in martial arts. A YouTube search of `Martial Arts` will bring up millions of results, some great, some fricking awful but all with someone’s own interpretation of self defence, martial arts or combat sports. When this interpretation is based on experience, knowledge, blood, sweat and tears, fantastic, we need people to push the boundaries and evolve with the times. When this interpretation is based on a few books bought on eBay, and a few hours spent watching some MMA highlights, the interpretation lacks some credibility. What seems funny is that it is often the ones with the least real life experience of training or fighting, that seem most vocal in their interpretation of it, probably due to the fact they overestimate their own ability and the genuine skill and depth of knowledge from others.

Martial arts and self defence require years of study. You learn the basics, you explore the techniques, you make the techniques your own, keeping the principles from the basics. You then interpret the techniques, expand or narrow them down and then teach to others. It seems sometimes people tend to go step 1 to teaching others straight away, posting videos, advertising events and claiming expert level knowledge. Anyone can write a book on a subject. Anyone can teach a class on a subject. All it takes is a bit of research. What makes the difference is the interaction with the students and the way it is presented however. The individual knowing only the basics will be narrow in their approach, teaching a few techniques or principles and that’s it. There will be no individual feedback, no scenario training, no allowances for different sizes or strengths, no question and answer session. The knowledge will be one dimensional and lack substance. The only people who will learn from this is those who know less than you. Put up against someone with some knowledge and you’re in a proverbial creek without a paddle.

Too much information is available today especially in the case of martial arts, many of which have long traditions, cultures and principles that can’t be learnt in a matter of weeks. Looking at the source of the information is crucial. What’s their background? Do they claim to hold a 12th degree black belt in 72 different styles of killer Kung Fu and once kicked Chuck Norris in the face? If so, call bullshit. This type of filtering down of the arts dilutes the whole process and lowers the bar for all involved to the point where you get 4th degree black belts who couldn’t punch their way out of a paper bag. Loads of people know wayyyy more about martial arts and self defence than I do and when they speak, I shut up and pay attention. They are the ones who keep quiet and wait to be asked their opinion on a topic, not jump at the first opportunity to prove their knowledge and skill. They are the ones who offer a range of answers for a particular question, never black and white answers.

They are the ones worth learning from and dedicating your time and efforts to.

MAUnity will be launching soon. It will showcase these people. These people who are experts in their field and have tried and tested their methods. It will be a webshow with a different style of the week each week showcasing a style of martial art of self defence, along with background and clips. It will include reviews, expert tutorials, interviews and anything else we can think of along the way! It’s taking a lot of work to get PERFECT so bear with us but it will be here. The Martial View will become MAUnity in the hope of being a place of genuine knowledge for sport, self defence and traditional martial arts. I’ll be the host, which I apologize for as I have a face made for radio, but the content will be great with some top quality martial artists and self defence instructors already on board. It’s coming!

Want to be involved? Get in touch!

Is YouTube good for the Martial Arts?

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Is YouTube good forĀ the Martial Arts?

I think we can all agree that we live in a technological age. An age where videos of cats go viral and takeaway food can be ordered to your home in a few simple clicks. But what does this mean for the martial arts? Type in martial arts on YouTube, the second biggest search engine after Google, and you get roughly 1,220,000 results. Wow, that’s a lot of martial arts action. Is this a good thing or a bad thing however? YouTube can be great in a number of ways for the martial arts, but as with most things, there are also a few drawbacks to martial arts and its YouTube audience.

Let’s start with the positive. Most obviously, it’s a massively awesome resource for getting your content out there. Whether it’s through advertising your school by releasing promo videos or training clips, it can easily get seen by a wide range of people, meaning your school, your art and you get put out there into the world of cyberspace! This can lead to a great following, increased students and great networking opportunities. Secondly it can be a great resource for finding out about different styles. You decide to try a new martial art out down the road but have no idea what it is. A quick YouTube search will give you video clips on it and help you gain more of an understanding about whether it is for you. Basically YouTube is a wicked tool for getting information out there to the masses in terms of martial arts and creating a great network if done right.

Getting content out there is great, but it has to be great content and let’s face it, there’s a whole lot of crap out there too. Someone knowing nothing about the martial arts decides to type martial arts in on YouTube and the first video they decide to watch is idiots getting knocked out by someone looking at themĀ (see the clip below at 1 minute 10 and prepare to be blown away…), or watching some weird Mortal Kombat stuff that looks great on TV and Film but will pretty rapidly get you an arse kicking in real life. It can be off putting to people who have no experience of martial arts.

 

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Linking with this, there are the cyber keyboard warriors. Whenever you post something online, it’s pretty much fair game for people to comment both positive and negative. I’ve found this even with The Martial View. People see what you’re doing, either like it and feel threatened, or don’t like it and feel threatened, then decide to go trolling! Look on any YouTube video of any martial art or martial artist and they’ll be a fair few comments from people saying how the stuff looks fake, or it’ll never really work, or that martial arts are all white pajamas, loud shouting and smashing the contents of B&Q up with your fists and legs. Now granted these keyboard warriors are probably spotty computer nerds who have never stepped on the mats in their life but they can still a hindrance, especially in a field such as martial arts.

Finally, there is such a wealth of information out there on YouTube at the moment in respect to the martial arts, that some people may not even think it’s necessary to join a school or get an instructor. Type in `right hook` on YouTube, they’ll be thousands of tutorials showing how to throw a right hook, similarly type in `choke defence`, they’ll be the same, some good, some frankly awful. Part of the fun of martial arts training is the social aspect, you meet new people, train with a partner, make new friends and join in the martial arts community in order to develop yourself. Pretty hard to do that when you sit punching a bag in your living room thinking you’ve nailed the jab, cross and can defend against grabs, punches and chokes while your long suffering (but gone viral) cat looks on. Martial arts are physical and technical and no amount of online training or video is going to beat going to an academy, getting a decent instructor and getting training.

YouTube can be an awesome resource for the martial arts, as long as it’s used correctly and as long as we don’t become completely obsessed with the digital age. This is not The Matrix, you are NOT Neo and can’t have Jiu-Jitsu plugged into your brain so you’re a master at it in a few minutes……cool as that would be…. Getting good at any martial art requires physical ability as well as dedication and having a great instructor, and unfortunately, YouTube is not a great instructor for the martial arts!