Are you too old to train? The Mike Tyson comeback…

“It is not true that people stop pursuing dreams because they grow old, they grow old because they stop pursuing dreams.”

I’m excited. Amid all the doom and gloom of Coronavirus and the fear in the world today, I saw something to potentially get excited about… The return of Mike Tyson to boxing.

That’s right… THE Mike Tyson!

Sure it will be for some exhibition matches raising money for charity, probably for 3 or 4 rounds, but hey! This is exciting stuff and got me thinking…

At what age should you hang up for gloves for good?

Tyson is now 53 years old and has his last fight 15 years ago at age 38. His return to the ring for some will be exciting and even inspirational, yet others, most notably George Foreman, have warned him to stay out the ring and that he has nothing more to prove.

So what do you think? Is there a time when a fighter should just retire, never to step foot in the ring or cage again and when is that time?

I’ve heard a few times martial artists say that the difference between martial arts and combat sports is that combat sports often have a peak. An age where you are as strong, fit and agile as you can possibly be.

After this peak has been reached, there is a steady decline where the body simply cannot take the same amount of punishment as it did before. Skill diminishes therefore retirement happens.

With martial arts however, the peak doesn’t reach as early as skill level increases consistently. A fine example of this would be Dan Inosanto – aged 83 and still hosting seminars around the world (pre-corona) and as skilled and talented as he ever was.

This may be due to a number of reasons:

The punishment the body takes…

Professional fighters put their bodies through so much on a daily basis. From regular hard sparring sessions, to fitness building that takes you to the edge and pushes you both mentally and physically – combat sports are tough man! That’s not even counting the fights themselves! Repeated kicks to the legs, punches to the body and head and general wear and tear take their toll and this for sure is a reason why combat sport competitors reach a peak.

Martial artists on the other hand – by broad stroke and not all, tend to train a little less intensely. Many don’t fight competitively, preferring to train for their own reasons such as fitness, health and personal safety perhaps. When and if they spar, it’s technical sparring which doesn’t kill you at the end and the level of punishment the body takes simply isn’t the same.

The martial art you choose…

Some martial arts are built with health and longevity in mind. If we look at some of the more esoteric martial arts such as Tai Chi or even some forms of Aikido (I know, I trained Aikido), the movements are more flowing and graceful. Many cite martial arts as a fantastic way to stay healthy, but this really does depend on the martial art you choose!

Enter the shark tank in an MMA gym, have an hour rolling session in BJJ or a hard sparring session and ask yourself at the end if you feel healthy! I’ve even had Aikido sessions where I have thrown up from exertion and the next day every inch of me has been bruised and achy – Thanks Joe Thambu Sensei…

The martial art you choose and it’s main function will often depend if you hit a peak. You don’t see many active 60 year olds in a kickboxing gym, but will see that age practicing Kung Fu or Tai Chi perhaps. Certain martial arts hit a certain demographic and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that.

So to bring it back to the original point… Should there be an age where you can no longer fight competitively?

Are you fighting competitively now and what’s your plan for the future? Will you do a Tyson and fight until you can’t anymore?

Are you getting older now and has your training adapted and changed as a result?

Are you young and simply wanting to just kill someone in training?!

Let me know!

Review! The Mittmaster Vault!

Hey everyone!!

I know it’s been a while since last posting and for that I apologise! It’s been super busy building my own martial arts school, training up some assistant instructors and of course getting my own training in too!

It’s calmed down a little now so what better way to kick off another post in The Martial View than with a article on Matthew Chapman’s Mittmaster Vault!

I’ve previously written articles on Matt’s products before, specifically his 99 ways to get a student book – a review of which you can find here.

I’ve trained with Matt on a number of occasions and know he has a wealth of knowledge to transmit both in terms of martial arts and also business knowledge! As a result I was super excited to get stuck into his Mittmaster vault and I wasn’t left disappointed!

The first thing that really stands out about the vault is the ease of use and professionalism of the videos. The layout is simple and easy to use and you can immediately see what video you are going to watch and what the topic will be on! This is different to other online platforms I have seen which have many different folders, meaning it takes time to navigate to the particular section you want.

Not the case with The Vault! You can just click on the month, then see the videos available and what art they relate to, be it MMA, Muay Thai, Filipino Boxing or Boxing! Click away and the video plays…

Now on to the videos! All in all – AWESOME! Many of you have seen Matt’s approach to teaching before in his previous MittMaster videos or even in person and his relaxed yet informative tone means you get a lot out of the videos in a relaxed and fun way. The videos are show in HD and special attention is paid to certain areas of the drill or common mistakes that people make, meaning you can get some great knowledge from Matt to improve your own training or introduce into classes you run.

With this all in mind I would recommend the MittMaster vault to anyone seriously into martial arts as either an instructor or just a student. The videos can really add to your own knowledge and ability to both pad feed and perform the drills from Boxing, MMA, Muay Thai and Filipino arts and there really is a wealth of information in the vault easily broken down and able to digest in small and easy amounts.

The Vault is available here and would be a great addition for any martial artists resources out there!