Talking nutrition with `The Body Engineer`

Today I am interviewing Casey Marshall A.K.A. The Body Engineer. It’s Friday so that means interview release day – I hope you’re all excited! Casey comes from a martial arts family, and her father is a good friend of mine and honorary coach at my Empower Martial Arts Academy. David Titch Marshall used to be a professional kickboxer and Muay Thai fighter before he got old… but the apple hasn’t fallen far from the tree with Casey!

Casey has competed in martial arts from a young age in all sorts of categories including MMA and weapons. If it’s martial arts related – she’s there! She’s now translated this into coaching while studying for her MA in Sports Nutrition and building her brand The Body Engineer.

We talk about why nutrition is so important for everyone – not just elite athletes. Casey offers some quick and easy tips for staying healthy during lock-down when the temptation is to close the curtains and go face down into a chocolate cake. Something I’ve always struggled with is meal prepping too – how much to prep? How long does it stay okay in the fridge? What are the benefits? Casey answers all these questions and more so you can be a meal prep expert in no time!

You can contact Casey through Instagram and Facebook for hints and tips on nutrition and training. Just search for The Body Engineer.

Check out the interview below via YouTube or if you would prefer to simply listen to it – just head over to our Podcast feed or Spotify and the interview will be live there!

I’ve got lots of content planned for the podcast, YouTube channel and the blog, so make sure you subscribe to the site to never miss an episode! You can also follow me on Facebook and Instagram at The Martial View and don’t forget to join our community group where the discussions take place!

As always – if you’d like to see something or have any questions. Get in touch!

Martial Arts Fitness and Agility

mma-workout

Fitness and Agility for the Martial Artist

What is needed to be a good martial artist? Is it the ability to deliver a one punch knockout? A thorough knowledge of all techniques in your chosen art? How about a bad-ass Bruce Lee yell to strike fear into the hearts of any would be attackers? These may all be important factors, yet in my opinion, fitness, and in particular flexibility, agility and coordination, are the bench marks for a solid martial artist.

Martial artists need to be fit for purpose. Bodybuilders lift the heaviest weights possible so that they can tear the muscles in order for them to be built up bigger and stronger. While I admire this dedication to training, it has its limits for the martial artist, due to the fact that if they were to become massively stacked and ripped with muscles, their agility would suffer and they would no longer be fit for purpose. A certain amount of muscle mass is needed for the martial arts without a doubt, but this should be lean muscle so as to still be quick, nimble and agile.

Arnold Schwarzenegger as a bodybuilder. No doubt dedicated and an excellent example, but limited if he were a martial artist

Arnold Schwarzenegger as a bodybuilder. No doubt dedicated and an excellent example, but limited if he were a martial artist

Bruce Lee's physique was functionally fit for his discipline

Bruce Lee’s physique was functionally fit for his discipline

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As a result of this, time spent at the gym lifting heavy weights in order to build muscle has its limits in terms of martial arts. Other methods of training are preferable in my opinion. Kettlebell training delivers a full range of motion in its movements, building lean muscle and increasing cardiovascular endurance, while also stripping away body fat. Gymnastics also offer great training, again building lean muscle and reducing fat, while also building general fitness, flexibility, agility and coordination. This can be shown in the training of welterweight UFC champion Georges St Pierre, who regularly uses gymnastics as an addition to his mixed martial arts training.

Flexibility, as well as being useful in certain martial arts such as Taekwondo for kicking skill, can also help reduce the chances of injury for any athlete due to the muscles and surrounding tissue being more pliable. This allows greater movement in the body, reducing the chances of torn muscles and other such injuries. Yoga and pilates can be excellent for this, improving flexibility, as well as developing the core muscle groups needed for martial arts in addition to regulating the breathing.

Agility and coordination are perhaps the most important attributes for the martial artist in my opinion. If you are not agile, you are slow, making it easier to be attacked both in terms of practical self defence, and also traditional training. If you are not coordinated, you will find it difficult to employ power in your punches or kicks, due to the fact your body isn’t working as one unit. The punch will always come from the arm, not the hip and so power will be restricted. As already said, gymnastics are great for both agility and coordination as well as building functional muscle. Other exercises such as ladder runs can improve speed and agility, as well as cardiovascular fitness

Fitness is a personal thing. Some people wish to develop their muscles, getting them as big as possible such as in the case of bodybuilders. Others wish to focus more on cardiovascular training, paying little thought to weight training such as marathon runners. Martial artists should, in my opinion, focus on both. The well rounded martial artist should be agile and flexible with lean muscle in order to produce power when needed. As such, training in a multitude of arts can be useful. To supplement regular martial arts training, gymnastics could be done to focus on coordination and lean muscle gains or ladder run drills could be performed to focus on agility and cardiovascular endurance. This kind of training will lead to the more developed and well rounded martial artist.

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